The psychology behind taking dirty money from Jeffrey Epstein

The psychology behind taking dirty money from Jeffrey Epstein »

People have a deep-seated aversion to morally tainted money, but also a strong temptation for the reward. When people take dirty money, this inner conflict is resolved with rationalization. And the power of rationalization is so strong that people will engage in elaborate cognitive gymnastics not to see the negative ramifications of what they have just done. Our behavior will shapeshift to protect our benefactor.

Research on conflicts of interest shows that, when confronted with the possibility that their benefactor is morally dubious, people will look the other way, selectively examine the evidence in front of them, and generally focus on whatever slim evidence remains that their benefactor has redeeming qualities. As Upton Sinclair observed, it is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.

Albuquerque Journal
— Read on www.google.com.au/amp/s/www.abqjournal.com/1369072/the-psychology-behind-taking-dirty-money-from-jeffrey-epstein-ex-the-power-of-rationalization-is-so-strong-that-our-behavior-will-shapeshift-to-protect-our-benefactor.html/amp

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